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Economie et Politique_Renseignements

EPR - André Mascardi

Economie et Politique_Renseignements

LA DETTE GRECQUE ET WALL STREET

Les marchés financiers, Wall Street et Goldman Sachts ont joué avec l'avenir de la Grèce mais aussi avec la santé de ses habitants, en spéculant tout bonnement comme ils le font chaque seconde avec n'importe quel produit financier ou marchandise...

Goldman Sachs et la bourse ont joué les agents doubles en trichant, mentant et surtout en jouant "pour eux et contre eux", en diffusant des rumeurs qui faisaient monter ou baisser les places financières et - délit d'initié oblige car ce sont eux qui créaient la nouvelle -, ils ont joué comme tout acteur financier qui connaissant la tendance du marché , spécule dans le sens de leurs informations par des ordres "bid" ou "ask", en amplifiant les phénomènes par l'achat de produits dérivés alternatifs pour des sommes "kolossales" !

Robert Reich, ancien secrétaire au travail de Bill Clinton, explique pourquoi la Grèce est une victime des marchés financiers internationaux et ne doit pas être jugé sur ses tentatives improductives pour sortir le pays de l'impasse où on l'a mis !

En espérant que vous lisez l'Anglais....

"Greece is all over the news this week—but how come so few people are talking about Wall Street's role in creating the crisis, or what people like us can do to change the outcome? Let's talk about it—and do something about it. Read on to see how I see it. Once you've read this, please chip in to help MoveOn launch an emergency global campaign for progress, not austerity. People seem to forget that the Greek debt crisis—which is becoming a European and even possibly a world economic crisis—grew out of a deal with Goldman Sachs, engineered by Goldman's Lloyd Blankfein. Several years ago, Blankfein and his Goldman team helped Greece hide the true extent of its debt—and in the process almost doubled it. When the first debt deal was struck in 2001, Greece owed about 600 million euros ($793 million) more than the 2.8 billion euros it had borrowed. Goldman then cooked up an off-the-books derivative for Greece that disguised the shortfall but increased the government's losses to 5.1 billion euros. In 2005, the deal was restructured and the 5.1 billion euro debt was locked in. After that, Goldman and the rest of Wall Street pulled the global economy to its knees—whacking Greece even harder. Undoubtedly, Greece suffers from years of corruption and tax avoidance by its wealthy. But Goldman Sachs isn't exactly innocent. It padded its profits by catastrophically leveraging up the global economy with secret, off-balance-sheet debt deals. Did any of its executives ever go to jail? Of course not. They all got fat bonuses and promotions. Blankfein, now CEO, raked in $24 million in 2014 alone. Meanwhile, the people of Greece struggle to buy medicine and food. Economists Thomas Piketty and Jeffrey Sachs also have weighed in, writing in The Nation that the results of European austerity in Greece have hit the vulnerable the worst—"40 percent of children now live in poverty, infant mortality is sky-rocketing and youth unemployment is close to 50 percent."1 Debt restructuring must be part of any solution for economic reforms in Greece. But instead of doing that, the European powers have made eleventh-hour, draconian demands: slash pensions, privatize even more core state functions, and attack unions and workers' collective bargaining rights.2 The U.S. can help make things better (instead of worse, like Goldman Sachs did). In addition to diplomatic power, the U.S. has voting power in the International Monetary Fund—one of Greece's creditors. President Obama and Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew can use their pulpits and their votes to yield a positive and just outcome. The Greek parliament on Friday approved a new plan that Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras proposed, but so far the European parties aren't offering up the debt restructuring that's needed for a real solution and instead are demanding even more draconian austerity measures from Greece to even keep talking."